Let's Talk Wedding Flowers - Boutonnieres, Pocket Squares! Sixth Post in a Series

 
Trio of boutonniere possibilities…. The Big Fake Wedding @ Willowdale Estate Photo by Hourglass Photography… Designs by Maureen Christmas AIFD CFD EMC of Floral Notes, Acton, MA

Trio of boutonniere possibilities…. The Big Fake Wedding @ Willowdale Estate Photo by Hourglass Photography… Designs by Maureen Christmas AIFD CFD EMC of Floral Notes, Acton, MA

In addition to bouquets, the world of personal flowers includes boutonnieres, pocket squares, and assorted styles of corsages. This post addresses flowers traditionally thought to be for the guys but there’s no reason a gal couldn’t wear them.

Boutonniere - the word is French for buttonhole flower. As far back as the 16th century, they were worn to ward off evil spirits and bad luck. It became fashionable to leave the top button open thus forming a lapel and then the flower was pinned to it.

The possibilities for what comprises today’s boutonnieres are endless. I love being inspired by the buckets of wedding flowers waiting to be put into bouquets and centerpieces. From these, I create boutonnieres personalized for your wedding. A simple rose, add some greenery and perhaps a touch of gold penny cress and you have a timeless classic. Not your style? I can use seed pods and foliage to create a natural look.

White rose boutonniere with waxflower and gold pennycress by Maureen Christmas AIFD CFD EMC of Floral Notes, Acton, MA

White rose boutonniere with waxflower and gold pennycress by Maureen Christmas AIFD CFD EMC of Floral Notes, Acton, MA

Rustic charm wrapped in paper covered wire

Rustic charm wrapped in paper covered wire

Ready for a Cape Cod Harbor wedding

Ready for a Cape Cod Harbor wedding

Fall wedding at the top of Killington, VT

Fall wedding at the top of Killington, VT

Are you into cooking? making beer? golfing? I can personalize your boutonnieres with sprigs of rosemary, hops and even golf tees.

Boutonnieres with hops grown by the couple. Wedding at Harrington Farm, Princeton, MA

Boutonnieres with hops grown by the couple. Wedding at Harrington Farm, Princeton, MA

Another option, shown in the first photograph is a pocket square. It is made of foam core or heavy weight card stock and gets tucked into the jacket pocket. Flowers and other ‘bits’ are glued right to it using s special floral adhesive.

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Who wears a boutonniere? For your wedding, it’s customary for the groom, the groomsmen and dads to wear them. The granddads are always pleased to be remembered. If there are brothers not in the wedding party, it’s nice to think of them as well. The officiant is another person to consider. I particularly enjoy making tiny boutonnieres for ring bearers - even pinning them to the back of their jackets between the shoulder blades out of their reach if they are really young and likely to be held in someone’s arms.

Let's Talk Wedding Flowers - After the Ceremony - The Reception! Fifth in a Series of Posts

 
A fairy tale setting created with elevated designs of rich colors in gold candelabras. A garland, mercury glass votives, floating candle and petite vases with flowers bring the interest to the tabletop. At The Mansion on Turner Hill. Photo by Carly Michelle Photography.

A fairy tale setting created with elevated designs of rich colors in gold candelabras. A garland, mercury glass votives, floating candle and petite vases with flowers bring the interest to the tabletop. At The Mansion on Turner Hill. Photo by Carly Michelle Photography.

Centerpieces are composed of two part - flowers/foliage and hard goods/containers. The same flowers placed low on the table in a container that is not visible or in wooden box or in a mercury glass compote (a dish/bowl that has been elevated) have three distinct feelings to them. Flowers and hard goods work together to achieve your vision.

There are low and elevated centerpieces. Elevated centerpieces are great to add drama and impact when your guests walk into the room - especially if it is large.  I’m careful to use containers that are clear or slender enough that they don’t block the view across the table.  I can design flowers atop a tall glass vase or I can rent candelabras we select together and flowers are place on top as well as cascading down them. Calla lilies, orchids, amaranthus and ruscus are my favorites for the cascade. A combination of elevated and low centerpieces is always a hit. As elevated centerpieces have more cost involved, I frequently suggest using the less expensive trio of floating candles as a third centerpiece option to average costs out. (FYI - Certain cities/towns have restrictions on open flames).

The low centerpiece in a gold compote from the same wedding shown above. Extra-special blooms and detail is used here as they are easily appreciated by the guests. The Mansion on Turner Hill. Photo by Carly Michelle Photography

The low centerpiece in a gold compote from the same wedding shown above. Extra-special blooms and detail is used here as they are easily appreciated by the guests. The Mansion on Turner Hill. Photo by Carly Michelle Photography

Let the vibe of the venue direct you. You’ve chosen it for a reason. Is it rustic or a natural setting? A rustic venue begs for seasonal flowers such as tulips in the spring and sunflowers in the fall. To me, rustic means lots of texture. Garden roses, soft greenery including ferns and grasses, daisies, carnations (the growers have bred some incredibly unique and unusual colors!), chrysanthemums, love-in-the mist, waxflower, seed pods, phlox, zinnias, astilbe, pussy willow and other seasonal branches are all excellent choices. Birch containers, twig stands and wrought iron are great places to start your design plan. Or perhaps lanterns and galvanized tin containers. A rustic venue doesn’t mean it can’t be elegant. I’ve frequently used mercury glass compotes in conjunction with wooden boxes (sometimes trimmed in lace) to achieve a ‘Rustic Elegance’ look.

Jewel tones and luxurious textures describe this fall design. The Barn at Gibbet Hill.

Jewel tones and luxurious textures describe this fall design. The Barn at Gibbet Hill.

Popular at many venues are the appearance of farm tables. These give the opportunity for extending the flowers down the table. A garland or greenery with candles and lanterns are another option.

Trio of glass bowls connected with twigs are brimming with premium blooms in this design perfect for a farm table. The Country Club, Brookline, MA

Trio of glass bowls connected with twigs are brimming with premium blooms in this design perfect for a farm table. The Country Club, Brookline, MA

A lemon leaf garland with gold lanterns on a pale green runner defined the head table. Sprigs of dried raffia greeted each guest. Brewster Academy, Lake Winnipesaukee, Wolfeboro, NH

A lemon leaf garland with gold lanterns on a pale green runner defined the head table. Sprigs of dried raffia greeted each guest. Brewster Academy, Lake Winnipesaukee, Wolfeboro, NH

Are you celebrating in a garden? (or a tent in a garden?) If your ceremony is also here, this is the perfect time to use columns to elevate large designs dripping with flowers. I can guide your selection to the appropriate style. For example – if your wedding colors are all pastels, I have the perfect lacy wrought iron columns to harmonize with the mood of the flowers. Wrought iron or stone urns (or those that look like iron or stone without the weight) would be beautiful. For the tables, stone containers mixed with mercury glass (okay – I admit I have a bias towards the look mercury glass can add to a table!) would be very ‘Garden Chic’. Wooden boxes and clear glass would also be appropriate. My favorite flowers for this look are garden roses, hybrid tea roses, spray roses, hydrangeas, lilies, seeded eucalyptus, love-in-the mist, carnations, lisianthus, alstromeria, stock, astilbe with assorted greenery including plumosa, pittosporum, and fern. Greenery can be hung around the tent to bring the outside in.

Flowers in lanterns, compotes and wooden boxes are ready to be placed in this garden wedding. Mercury glass balls unite the box design with the compotes.

Flowers in lanterns, compotes and wooden boxes are ready to be placed in this garden wedding. Mercury glass balls unite the box design with the compotes.

Hydrangeas, hosta flowers and leaves, lilies, love-in-the-mist, tree fern and eryngium are right at home in a stone container.

Hydrangeas, hosta flowers and leaves, lilies, love-in-the-mist, tree fern and eryngium are right at home in a stone container.

So, what about ballrooms and country clubs? Each one has an individual personality that I take into consideration when developing a design plan.  Sparkling clean glass with fresh greenery and flowers will always be a great choice as is mercury glass (what a surprise!). There are excellent ceramic containers ranging in style from the traditional to a more ‘City Chic’ look. A combination of elevated and low centerpieces is always a hit. As elevated centerpieces have more cost involved, I suggest using a trio of floating candles as a third centerpiece option to help average it out. (Certain cities/towns have restrictions on open flames). If your venue has an old-world charm to it, combinations of previously mentioned flowers would work well.  If it is modern or urban, I like to add tropical flowers to give it a contemporary edge.  Tropicals mixed with temperate flowers provide lots of interesting looks.

A mix of crisp, clean elevated and low designs are the perfect mix at this golf course setting. The International, Bolton, MA

A mix of crisp, clean elevated and low designs are the perfect mix at this golf course setting. The International, Bolton, MA

Trio of floating candles with floral accent. They can be used with or without the mirror. Greens could also be added at the base. Brae Burn Country Club

Trio of floating candles with floral accent. They can be used with or without the mirror. Greens could also be added at the base. Brae Burn Country Club

There are so many less traditional options for venues. Breweries, wineries, the seaside, art museums, science museums, historic houses, libraries, mountaintops, rooftops(!), and even Fenway Park to name a few.  Each have a unique vibe and I would love the opportunity to put my experience and interpretative skills to work to make it extraordinary for you!